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Archive for February, 2010

AJ2010 City Tour [youtube]

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“What Teachers Make,” by TAYLOR MALI

What Teachers Make, or Objection Overruled, or
If things don’t work out, you can always go to law school

He says the problem with teachers is, “What’s a kid going to learn
from someone who decided his best option in life was to become a teacher?”
He reminds the other dinner guests that it’s true what they say about
teachers:

Those who can, do; those who can’t, teach.

I decide to bite my tongue instead of his
and resist the temptation to remind the other dinner guests
that it’s also true what they say about lawyers.

Because we’re eating, after all, and this is polite company.

“I mean, you’re a teacher, Taylor,” he says.
“Be honest. What do you make?”

And I wish he hadn’t done that
(asked me to be honest)
because, you see, I have a policy
about honesty and ass-kicking:
if you ask for it, I have to let you have it.

You want to know what I make?

I make kids work harder than they ever thought they could.
I can make a C+ feel like a Congressional medal of honor
and an A- feel like a slap in the face.
How dare you waste my time with anything less than your very best.

I make kids sit through 40 minutes of study hall
in absolute silence. No, you may not work in groups.
No, you may not ask a question.
Why won’t I let you get a drink of water?
Because you’re not thirsty, you’re bored, that’s why.

I make parents tremble in fear when I call home:
I hope I haven’t called at a bad time,
I just wanted to talk to you about something Billy said today.
Billy said, “Leave the kid alone. I still cry sometimes, don’t you?”
And it was the noblest act of courage I have ever seen.

I make parents see their children for who they are
and what they can be.

You want to know what I make?

I make kids wonder,
I make them question.
I make them criticize.
I make them apologize and mean it.
I make them write, write, write.
And then I make them read.
I make them spell definitely beautiful, definitely beautiful, definitely beautiful
over and over and over again until they will never misspell
either one of those words again.
I make them show all their work in math.
And hide it on their final drafts in English.
I make them understand that if you got this (brains)
then you follow this (heart) and if someone ever tries to judge you
by what you make, you give them this (the finger).

Let me break it down for you, so you know what I say is true:
I make a goddamn difference! What about you?

— Taylor Mali, What Teachers Make
http://www.taylormali.com

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ScoutLinks February-2010

“Adventure is worthwhile.”
— Aristotle

MARCH 2010 BSA Cub Scout Theme: TAKE FLIGHT
The Wright brothers had a lot of courage to accomplish their dream to fly. Air has power to push and pull objects so that they can fly. This month learn all about air, what it consists of, and why it is needed to fly. Learn about gravity. Make your own flying machines as you hear about the Wright Brothers and their invention. Explore different types of paper airplanes. Figure out which ones fly farther, higher, faster, longer, and why? Hold a pack-wide paper plane derby fun night! How many things can you name that can fly? Study birds and their flyways. Why do some fly in a V formation? Take flight outdoors with a den or pack kite derby this month and enjoy that air! Take a field trip to the airport, hobby shop, or a science museum. …

Hovercraft night held by Air Scouts Canberra
The Air Scouts Canberra Cub Pack like to fly as much as possible even if it is only just off the ground. This week we made Hovercrafts one with balloons and CD and another larger hovercraft from plastic, board and leaf blowers.
Hovercraft night held by Air Scouts Canberra (2010-Feb-10) [Scouts ACT]

Boy’s Life Magazine
Links found in February 2010 Boys’ Life magazine

Western Australian Scout eNews
Chief’s Corner – February 2010

Scouts Tasmaina
February Newsletter [PDF]

The Dump
This month my featured book from “The Dump” Resources For Scouting is; B.P.’s Outlook [PDF] A collection of articles written for “The Scouter”. Also available via the USSP in HTML.

The best principle to this end is to get the boys to learn for themselves by giving them a curriculum which appeals to them, rather than by hammering it into them in some form of dry-bones instruction. We have to remember that the mass of the boys are already tired with hours of school or workshop, and our training should, therefore, be in the form of recreation, and this should be out of doors as much as possible.

That is the object of our badges and games, our examples and standards.

If you would read through your Scouting for Boys once more, with the Great Aim always before you, you will see its meaning the more clearly.

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