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Archive for March, 2010

The Leader’s ‘flashes’ return to the new uniform;

Leader Identification Badges will soon be available to all Uniform Section Leaders (at $3 per pair plus postage. GLs please submit Group orders to reduce postage cost.)
1. All Leaders and Adult Support Members (Uniform) can now wear shoulder flashes to identify the section of the Movement to which they belong.
2. Two flashes are to be worn, one on each shoulder, in the centre of the shirt shoulder panel one centimetre above the stitching of the top seam adjoining the sleeve to the shoulder panel
3. This identification will be for;
• Joey Scout Leader/Assistant Leader – A badge with a tan background, the Australian Scout Emblem and the words “Joey Scout”.
• Cub Scout Leader/Assistant Leader – A badge with a yellow background, the Australian Scout Emblem and the words “Cub Scout”.
• Scout Leader/Assistant Leader – A badge with a green background, the Australian Scout Emblem and the words “Scout”.
• Venturer Scout Leader/Assistant Leader – A badge with a maroon background, the Australian Scout Emblem and the words “Venturer Scout”.
• Rover Advisor/Assistant Rover Advisor – A badge with a red background, the Australian Scout Emblem and the words “Rover”.
• Group Leader and Assistant Group Leader – A badge with a white background, the Australian Scout Emblem and the word “Group”
4. Leader identification can be worn on the uniform from the time of investiture which should be at the time the new Leader is presented with their Certificate of Adult Membership.
Tasmanian Branch Newsletter, March 2010 [PDF]

Now people will have a chance to ‘go and see the Cub Leader’ about that, without the interrogation process to locate the Cub Leader 😉 Are these Australia wide or just for Tasmania?

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ScoutLinks March-2010

“The wild places are where we began.
When they end, so do we.”

— David Brower, Friends of the Earth

APRIL 2010 BSA Cub Scout Theme: SPRING INTO ACTION
This month is a good time to spring into action with outdoor activities such as hikes, sports and games, cleaning up litter along ponds, parks or roadsides, or planting some trees for improved habitat. Make plaster casts of the animal tracks you find on your hike. Visit and talk with someone who works with wildlife conservation and visit a fish hatchery, zoo, animal shelter, or wildlife sanctuary. Bring along food and supplies that they might need as part of your “Good Turn for America.” Build bird houses, bird baths, feeding stations, or boxes for nesting materials. Do a community service project with your chartered organization to show your positive attitude in doing your best. …

Boy’s Life Magazine
Links found in March 2010 Boys’ Life magazine

Western Australian Scout eNews
Chief’s Corner – March 2010

Tasmanian Branch Newsletter
March 2010 [PDF]

UK Scouting Magazine
UK Scouting Magazine

Scouting complements school and family life, filling the needs not met by either. Our scouting youth like lots of other youth in the community engage in a variety of out-of-school activities both social and sporting. Focused activities for example Australian Rules football, Basketball, Tennis and including other activities similar to music lessons and karate are all great as they offer healthy and excellent outcomes. But focused activities tend to be just that “focused” on the particular chosen leisure pursuit. Scouting may have similar social and to a point, sporting related outcomes but scouting goes beyond what a dedicated activity can bring to an individual. …
Scouting from classroom to life experiences (2010-Mar-19) [Nashies Scouting Blog’s]

The Dump
This month my featured book from “The Dump” Resources For Scouting is; The Australasian Jamboree Song Book (1938-9). Songs 34, 40 and 42 are particular favourites.

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